Tag Archives: insulin resistance

diabetes Type 2

Type II Diabetes

A reader writes: I am a type II diabetic. I have had everything under control for five years and
all of a sudden I have gained 35 lbs. I eat ice cream and chocolate in huge
amounts daily. Sugar cravings. I just do not understand. My A1C has been 5-6
and now it is over 7. Help!

My response: You have already identified your problem–sugar intake raises blood sugar and insulin. Your insulin resistance is worse since starting this sugar binge. Insulin blocks your body’s ability to break down fat and utilize fat for energy, and it causes the body to convert glucose into fat for storage. Your fasting glucose levels have probably risen from 90 to 110 before to the present levels of 130 to 160, while your fasting insulin is probably in the teens or 20s (the ideal should be 5 or below). Treatment starts with stopping sugar intake, and reducing all carbohydrate intake to 60 to 100 grams per day. We have available a Sweet Freedom From Sugar program that has helped others get over their sugar addictions and cravings. Let us know if you are interested and we will put you on the interest list.

Diet healthy diet low carb muscle cramps

Cramps; Three Meals a Day or Frequent Snacks?

What is proper, 3 meals a day or small frequent snacks?
Advise on composition of meals.
Will excess fruits disrupts my efforts to lose?
Cramps related to my weight or is it a natural process at my age?

Cramps are usually indicative of a magnesium deficiency. Take 600 to 800 mg per day and see if they go away. They can also be related to dehydration, calcium deficiency, potassium deficiency.

I don’t think the controversy will ever end between the grazing recommendations and the 3-meal a day group. I take the position that we should be listening to our bodies and eating when it requests nutrients (we then feel hungry). This may be once a day or 6 times a day. The amount of physical labor done relates to nutrient need. What should our plate look like (composition of a meal)? 1/2 vegetables, 1/6 protein (legumes, nuts, meats), 1/6 healthy fats (avocado, olive oil, nuts), 1/6 carbohydrates (fruit for dessert, whole grain with the meal. If the carbohydrate intake is higher (lots of fruits), there is a greater tendency to put on weight; it’s very difficult to lose weight and leads to insulin resistance, especially if sugar is part of the diet.

blood sugar diabetes diabetes Type 2 insulin resistance

High Blood Sugar

A reader writes: grams of carbohydrates in foods for diets for those with high blood sugar?

High blood sugar is related to the amount of sugar (carbohydrates) that are eaten and how responsive your cells are to insulin and its ability to facilitate transfer of sugar into the cells.

It takes years of high sugar intake for the cell membranes and insulin receptors to become resistant to the normal insulin task of transferring sugar into the cell. This is called insulin resistance, a precursor of diabetes mellitus. Once this takes place, you have high blood sugar in the blood and high insulin in the blood. The insulin is being produced by the normal pancreas in response to the high blood sugar levels. Both high sugar in the blood and high insulin in the blood both cause problems in the body, so the goal is to make the cells less resistant. The treatment starts with lowering carbohydrate intake to 60 to 100 grams per day. There are also 3 minerals and 2 hormones that improve insulin resistance and assist in the treatment.

soda pop

Another Thing Wrong with Soda Pop

What’s another thing wrong with soda pop?

Soda pop either has sugar, or a “diet” sweetener, both of which cause you to gain weight. Additionally, both sugar and aspartame (or NutraSweet) cause inflammation in the body. 

Aspartame is actually wood alcohol with an aspartate and phenylalanine group (amino acid) hooked onto it.  The wood alcohol is detoxified in the liver into formaldehyde, which is a cancer-inducing agent.  It is also the preservative used in cadavers in medical school.  Formaldehyde is further broken down into formic acid, which is the highly inflammatory and painful sting of the fire ant

Sugar is not only inflammatory; it also induces insulin resistance, which means insulin levels increase in the body.  Insulin is one of the most inflammatory substances that the body makes.  Sugar causes tooth decay, behavioral changes, addiction, and a host of other health challenges.  It feeds candida, it feeds cancer: it’s just not good for us.  And yet, we are inundated with sugary “goodies” constantly. 

Soda pop is available everywhere.  It’s wise to avoid it.  

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Diabetes and Low Carb Diets

Low-Carb for diabetes question. Dr. Gardner, about 12 years ago during a work physical I was found to have fasting BG of 250. My Dad also had diabetes, and was not doing well with diabetes (and died from it a few years after). My doctor did not think that my diabetes was that bad yet, and started me on meds and the standard ADA diet. I did not lose any weight and felt terrible on the diet. After a couple of months of no improvement and frustration a friend who had Insulin Dependent Diabetes told me about the book “Diabetes Solution” by Dr. Bernstein. I started following that diet and exercise regime religiously and in a month had gotten my BG under control and stopped taking all meds. I keep my carbs around 50 a day, and do eat lots of what I call “salad type vegetables” and have been doing this for about 12 years. A few years ago I tried combining an apple with some protein to see if maybe my BG responded positively. It didn’t my BG shot up to 160 after two hours which I consider totally unacceptable. So for the last 12 years I’ve had one piece of fruit, that apple. I wonder what you think about Low-Carb diets for diabetes control?

Type II Diabetes is severe insulin resistance. Insulin resistance happens when the body is exposed to high levels of carbohydrates (the worst is sugar) over a prolonged period of time. The receptors that permit insulin to take sugar into the cell become resistant to that stimulation. This causes an elevation in blood sugar and insulin, both of which have their individual bad effects on the body.

Treatment consists of a reduction in the total amount of the carbohydrate intake, which reduces the insulin resistance and the cells become more responsive to insulin and glucose. After the reduction in carbohydrates (your 50 grams a day is great), there are other substances that improve this resistance–chromium, vanadium, biotin, and the hormones DHEA and testosterone.

The ADA diet is too high in carbohydrates, and I do not recommend a diabetic following it. Keep up with the low carbohydrate diet that is working so well for you.

diabetes insulin resistance

Low Carbs and Diabetes

I have a Low-Carb for diabetes question. Dr. Gardner, about 12 years ago during a work physical I was found to have fasting BG of 250. My Dad also had diabetes, and was not doing well with diabetes (and died from it a few years after). My doctor did not think that my diabetes was that bad yet, and started me on meds and the standard ADA diet. I did not lose any weight and felt terrible on the diet. After a couple of months of no improvement and frustration a friend who had Insulin Dependent Diabetes told me about the book “Diabetes Solution” by Dr. Bernstien. I started following that diet and exercise regime religiously and in a month had gotten my BG under control and stopped taking all meds. I keep my carbs around 50 a day, and do eat lots of what I call “salad type vegetables” and have been doing this for about 12 years. A few years ago I tried combining an apple with some protein to see if maybe my BG responded positively. It didn’t my BG shot up to 160 after two hours which I consider totally unacceptable. So for the last 12 years I’ve had one piece of fruit, that apple. I wonder what you think about Low-Carb diets for diabetes control?

Diabetes is not a life sentence.  Your body is capable of healing; my caution is in the case of  Type I, where the insulin producing cells in the pancreas have been damaged and insulin is no longer being produced.

Basically, diabetes type II is severe insulin resistance. This means the cell membrane, which houses the insulin receptors, is unresponsive to insulin and will not let it flow freely into the cell. This is usually caused by years of sugar and too much carbohydrate intake.

The treatment, then, consists of improving insulin resistance. This starts with a low carbohydrate intake, which you have already done. Congratulations on sticking with a 50 gram per day carb diet. Keep it up.

Five other things that improve insulin resistance:

  • chromium,
  • vanadium,
  • biotin,
  • DHEA,
  • testosterone.

You should already be on chromium, and possibly vanadium and biotin. You will need to get levels of DHEA and free testosterone through a health practitioner who is comfortable with using bio-identical hormones to bring those levels up if they are low. I do not consider age-appropriate levels as necessarily the healthy optimum, but I look at levels we had in our 20s as the most appropriate range.

Incidentally, the last time I looked at the ADA diet, they were recommending 150 to 250 grams of carbs per day for their patients. It is no wonder blood sugar levels are so high in those following the ADA diet. That also means the insulin levels are high, and insulin is the most inflammatory substance the body makes. As the insulin goes up, so does the total body inflammation, which makes you feel rotten. Keep up the low carb diet, and listen to your body.

insulin resistance

Sugar Intake for Insulin Resistance

How many grams of carbohydrates in foods for diets for those with high blood sugar?

The most common reason for high blood sugar is called insulin resistance, which means that insulin levels are also high.

Insulin is the most inflammatory substance the body makes, which adds to the harmful effects of high blood sugar by itself.

The typical cause of insulin resistance is long-term intake of too many carbohydrates, especially refined sugar. Even without high intake of sugars, high intake of bread, rice pasta, potatoes and fruit, all high in carbs, will cause the cells to resist the intake of glucose and keep the levels high in the blood stream. I recommend intake of no more than 60 to 100 grams of carbs daily to start changing the resistance. Some people have to ‘ease’ into it.  It is possible to take in even lower numbers of carbs, because there is no “carb daily requirement.”

Chromium, vanadium and biotin also help the body overcome the insulin resistance, as does DHEA and testosterone. Usually these levels are low in people with insulin resistance.

Diet insulin resistance type II diabetes

Type II Diabetes

How do we deal with type II diabetes without all the medication? I am appalled at the lists of side effects from my prescribed meds. I am obese and know that losing weight would help with the disease, but what else?

Type II diabetes is the end-stage of insulin resistance.

Insulin resistance is caused by the excessive intake of sugar and carbohydrates over several years or decades. The cell membranes of the body become ‘resistant’ to the flood of glucose available, so the glucose level and insulin level rise in the blood.

High glucose levels combine with protein in the body which we call glycation. If the protein glycated is nervous tissue, it causes tingling, pain, numbness which is called neuropathy. If the protein is kidney tissue the kidney starts to function less well until it goes into kidney failure. If the protein is red blood cells they become sticky and tend to clump, causing clotting and obstruction to the flow of blood. This is measured as Hemoglobin A1C. Platelets, blood vessel walls, retina tissue-all become glycated with glucose and cause problems. Insulin is one of the most inflammatory substances the body makes.

As the insulin levels rise, more inflammation is present in the body-headaches, joint aches, muscle aches, swelling, abdominal cramping, diarrhea, constipation, arrhythmias-all manifestations of inflammation.

So, the first step in the treatment of insulin resistance and type II diabetes is to stop the intake of all sugar and reduce the major carbohydrate load-bread, rice, pasta, potatoes, fruit.

Focus on the ingestion of vegetables, legumes, healthy fats (avocados, nuts, seeds, olive oil), and meats sparingly.

Supplements are very important, starting with a potent multivitamin and essential fatty acids. To help with insulin resistance, add chromium, vanadium and possibly biotin. DHEA and testosterone levels need to be well within the normal range to reduce insulin resistance. Glucophage (Metformin) also reduces insulin resistance, and also blocks the absorption of glucose from the intestinal tract. Because of the strong inflammation component, anti-oxidants need to be added-vitamins C and E, alpha-lipoic acid, perhaps even glutathione. Magnesium tends to be low in all diabetics so it also needs to be added.

Diabetes type II is both preventable and treatable. Start with the diet, which was the cause in the first place, then add the additional support.

diabetes insulin resistance sweet freedom from sugar training program

Stuck on Sugar? You’ve Come to the Right Place…

If you are feeling bloated

If you crave sweet treats and you’re cranky when you eat them, or you’re cranky when you don’t

If you have difficulty sleeping…or waking up

If you know sugar’s a problem for you, and you don’t know how to solve it

Sign up immediately for the Sweet Freedom from Sugar Training Course Interest List.  Why?  Because I’m offering the basic course (sans the bells and whistles)–with just the ebook, the workbook, and a DVD sent to your door for FREE.  You just pay $9.97 shipping/handling.  Oh–and if you want to really get yourself healthy, you can upgrade and get the bells and whistles, worth MANY times what you’ll pay for them, at the time we launch.

I’m only doing this once, guaranteed.  It’s worth $797 and I can’t ever do this again.  But I’m standing by my word.  You can have it for free, just pay shipping and handling.

The training course launches on June 18th at 3 p.m. EDT, noon Pacific.  When you get on the list, you get a jump start over everyone else.  I’ll notify you as we get closer.

If you’re serious about achieving dynamic health and energy, if you know you have a problem with sugar, or if anyone you know would be interested, please sign up on the interest list and pass the word along.  We’ll talk soon!  Dr. Stan

Allergy Candida insulin resistance sugar

Sugar, the Great “Food” Deceiver

Our association with sugar often contains fond memories.  Little girls are described as “sugar and spice and everything nice.”  Most social events are associated with some kind of sugar exposure.   I remember when we were raising our children that one of the highlights for them and probably also for me was the parent-child date, when we went out to get the chocolate dipped ice cream cones.  Sugar and chocolate seem to relieve depression, or when we are down in the dumps we can get a little sugar high and that helps with the mood.  Incentives in school and family are often sweets.  Memories of Christmas stockings, Easter, Halloween are filled with sugar treats. Suckers at the bank or in purses or pockets to quiet unhappy toddlers are a common event in our society. read more »